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What if THE BEATLES would've altered course to create an album called "DADDY ROAD?" What if Dave Grohl had opted not for his band to be the FOO FIGHTERS, but the more fecal-focused POO FIGHTERS? These are questions explored over at Dad On the Run's blog this week as he reworks some classic album covers into baby-inspired versions.

Published in Family Music
Saturday, February 23 2013 00:51

Caillou Rocks, so stop the hate. #CaillouRocks

Posted 2/23/2013, updated 6/29/2016

If you've followed The Rock Father from the beginning, you already know that Caillou is a big fixture here at Rock Father HQ (see Addie's 3rd Birthday). Truth be told, I wasn't familiar with the little bald Canadian before 2009 when my first daughter was born. I'd imagine that's also the case for many parents, as what childless adult is actually watching PBS Kids or Sprout (unless they also own a plain white van)? Yes, this little boy - eternally four years old - is much like another little baldy from when I was a kid, Charlie Brown. But that Caillou? In addition to being Addie's first love, he's a really divisive little s.o.b., and for that he demands respect.

Published in James' Journal

"Hipsters and Movember killed The Mustache Movement." I tweeted that statement on January 12, 2013 after seeing yet another baby product cross my path emblazoned with a mustache (or "moustache" for the extra-hip folk). I'm tired of seeing mustaches added to random crap, especially baby products. It's not funny or cute. 

Published in James' Journal

A couple of weeks ago, one of my favorite fellow Dad Bloggers sent up the Bat Signal for a project related to STAR WARS. Before I could fire back an email ("The first transport is away..."), the wheels were in motion for what would become quite possibly The Definitive Internet White Paper on When to Expose Your Kids to STAR WARS. Sam over at DorkDaddy.com (a site considered Rock Father-approved) had gone all Danny Ocean on us, pulling together a crew of 19 Dad Bloggers to throw down some virtual ink on one of parenting's most important issues.

Published in James' Journal

Originally posted on February 10, 2013... interestingly enough, a year later (2/16/2014) and Crayola has a different company handling PR for Toy Fair 2014 (it's Edelman now) and it's all back to "Mom." Pretty safe to assume that Crayola is steering the ship on this and not the PR folks.

UPDATED: On 2/19/2013, a rep from Coyne PR on behalf of Crayola sent me a nice message that included the following:

"Your post was very poignant and makes some great points. Dads do play an important role in raising their kids and our products are the tools to help Moms and Dads, along with Grandparents, care givers, etc. foster creativity and inspire imagination in children. As we move forward, we will look at how we present our information to be sure we are inclusive of all individuals who care about kids and support raising creatively inspired children."

ORIGINAL POST: It's Sunday night, and as most folks are watching the GRAMMYS (my wife included), I'm sitting here skimming through hundreds of press releases and product sheets rolling into Rock Father HQ from the American International Toy Fair in New York City. While I wish I'd gone this year, getting the news via email and the wires is the next best thing, though I have to be a little picky about what I cover here on The Rock Father as time is something I could use more of. One thing striking me as I check out the media materials from a lot of toy makers is how archaic their views of playtime, parenting, and family structure still are. Yes, despite all the strides made in the last year about "gender neutrality" (a huge media push, too) and the change in family structure, the old stereotypes are back this weekend in New York, and the charge is being led by some disappointing offenders.

Published in James' Journal

The Rock Father is pleased to present a special guest blog from Phil Shepley of Dad Vs. Spawn...

Who says that 80s hair metal was only about sex, drugs and rock n’ roll? Perhaps back then it was, but now it’s about so much more. It’s about being a parent.

Published in James' Journal
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