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If you've played video games at any point within the last three decades or so, there's a solid chance that you've owned a Mad Catz product. The longtime maker of gaming controllers and accessories was a fixture for years, but the last few were anything but kind for them. Following an expensive gamble on Rock Band 4, for which they served as co-publisher in addition to the hardware and accessory maker, the U.S.-based company went under, filing for bankruptcy in the spring of 2017. Now, the brand is back, now known as Mad Catz Global Limited, announcing what they've called "a surprise return to the international gaming scene... under new management, with new ideas, new attitude and most importantly, an entire range of new, high-quality gaming products." Check out a teaser below...

The reviewer has been compensated in the form of a Best Buy Gift Card and/or received the product/service at a reduced price or for free.

It's been more than eight years since my wife and I first became parents, and despite writing about gaming often, it wasn't until this year that I finally got to start spending some real time blowing up some pixels again. I upgraded from the Xbox 360 (which I still have) to the Xbox One S, promptly jumping right back into the kind of military-themed action I used to enjoy. After all, when it comes to fall, that means Call of Duty Season is open, but when I bought my system it came with Battlefield 1. Thing is, it's difficult to blow stuff up good when there's two little girls and a wife sleeping upstairs, and that means headphones. For the task at hand, I've got the Turtle Beach Stealth 700 Surround Sound Gaming Headset

Published in Tech

One of this year's fantastic releases is the Pearl Jam concert film, Let's Play Two. Filmed live right here in Chicago at the iconic Wrigley Field in August of 2016, the film serves as a beautiful documentary that celebrates the band and their fans during the year that the Chicago Cubs finally won the World Series. This week, the film got something unexpected - a companion video game. The vintage, 8-bit game recalls my many days playing baseball on the Nintendo Entertainment System (NES) back in the day, featuring the band members as baseball players in a "home run derby." Play the game online via Pearl Jam's website, and be sure to stick around at the end to hear 8-bit versions of "Alive" and "Jeremy."

Published in Music News

Last year, I was very fortunate to be visiting Nintendo of America at their HQ in Redmond, Washington on the very day that the famed NES Classic was released. My oldest daughter and I were able to purchase the sought-after miniature system from the employee store for MSRP - $59.99. As time would soon show us, it was much more difficult (nearly impossible) for members of the general public to get their hands on a system without paying vastly inflated prices thanks to the secondary market. Adding insult to injury, it was announced earlier this year that the system was done, and that it's being followed-up by the SNES Classic, prompting many to believe that a repeat of last year was shaping up - especially after pre-orders for the SNES sold-out in minutes. Today comes news that Nintendo is planning to make things right.

Every generation has their memorable entry point into the world of video gaming, and for The Rock Daughters™, I know they'll remember theirs as the Nintendo 3DS XL - the first system that they really got into. Now, even as we have the Nintendo Switch and the NES Classic Mini (need to get my hands on an SNES Classic!), their 3DS is the go-to, and for families looking to get into the handheld action, the Nintendo 3DS family of systems is a great entry point into a world that continues to grow, and for those looking for some real value, the new 2DS just may be the perfect starter, and this week brought the announcement of some new games and fun ahead...

I've never been much of a fan of motion control when it comes to video games (though I was a fan of the Power Glove in looks, not function), and the past decade or so proved that. The Wii felt gimmicky, and that thing that Sony made that looked like a massager with a ping pong ball attached was just goofy. Looks aside, the problem always was genuinely related to the fact that motion control just never seemed to work as advertised, and that stifled the intended fun. It's taken a lot of time, but with the Nintendo Switch, motion controls do work now, and with the release of ARMS, the full potential of the new Joy-Con controllers is front-and-center for a game that makes fighting more fun than it probably should be. In fact, ARMS is just fantastic.

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