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The Rock Daughters™ are Nintendo Kid Reviewers. Product provided for review by Nintendo of America.

When I first played Splatoon 2 at a Nintendo Switch launch event earlier this year, I immediately pegged it as a game that my girls were gonna love. I jumped-in to a test run of local multiplayer against a full field of players, the interesting aspect being that I was the one player in the mix who hadn't played the original Splatoon. On the surface, I thought it was a simple paintball game - a shooter in which kids could splatter their digital world and have a fine time doing it. Thing is, it's actually so much more, with a world of "Inkling" shapeshifters who move between humanoid and squid forms, swimming in ink to refill their weapons as they navigate a well-thought world with real missions. After receiving a copy of the game for review from our friends at Nintendo this summer, I've had a chance to play it myself, but I've also had the opportunity to see just how much the kids like it - but also how the digital world of Inkopolis has come to life in the real world via new toys from JAKKS Pacific.

Last year, I was very fortunate to be visiting Nintendo of America at their HQ in Redmond, Washington on the very day that the famed NES Classic was released. My oldest daughter and I were able to purchase the sought-after miniature system from the employee store for MSRP - $59.99. As time would soon show us, it was much more difficult (nearly impossible) for members of the general public to get their hands on a system without paying vastly inflated prices thanks to the secondary market. Adding insult to injury, it was announced earlier this year that the system was done, and that it's being followed-up by the SNES Classic, prompting many to believe that a repeat of last year was shaping up - especially after pre-orders for the SNES sold-out in minutes. Today comes news that Nintendo is planning to make things right.

Every generation has their memorable entry point into the world of video gaming, and for The Rock Daughters™, I know they'll remember theirs as the Nintendo 3DS XL - the first system that they really got into. Now, even as we have the Nintendo Switch and the NES Classic Mini (need to get my hands on an SNES Classic!), their 3DS is the go-to, and for families looking to get into the handheld action, the Nintendo 3DS family of systems is a great entry point into a world that continues to grow, and for those looking for some real value, the new 2DS just may be the perfect starter, and this week brought the announcement of some new games and fun ahead...

Pokémon the Movie: I Choose You! has been rolling out in Asia this summer, and now the latest film based on the Pokémon brand is coming to movie theaters around the world for two days this November. Audiences in the U.S. can look for the film to hit screens for two days only, on Sunday, November 5, and Monday, November 6, 2017 via Fathom Events.

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Last year, I lucked out as my oldest daughter and I happened to be at Nintendo of America HQ outside of Seattle on the very day that the much-anticipated NES Classic was released. We were technically there for a project related to the 3DS system, but the folks at Nintendo were kind enough to set aside a stack of Classics for folks in our group to purchase. Fortunately, I did grab the Mini edition of the famed 8-bit Nintendo Entertainment System, as the $59.99 item was quickly hard-to-come-by, and resellers were charging hundreds. When news came that the system was discontinued this spring (after failing to meet demand), rumors swirled that something new was in the pipeline... a Mini Edition of the Super Nintendo Entertainment System (SNES). Yesterday, the SNES Classic Edition was officially announced, and it's hitting the streets on September 29, 2017 with an MSRP of just $79.99.

I've never been much of a fan of motion control when it comes to video games (though I was a fan of the Power Glove in looks, not function), and the past decade or so proved that. The Wii felt gimmicky, and that thing that Sony made that looked like a massager with a ping pong ball attached was just goofy. Looks aside, the problem always was genuinely related to the fact that motion control just never seemed to work as advertised, and that stifled the intended fun. It's taken a lot of time, but with the Nintendo Switch, motion controls do work now, and with the release of ARMS, the full potential of the new Joy-Con controllers is front-and-center for a game that makes fighting more fun than it probably should be. In fact, ARMS is just fantastic.

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