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Construction is an extremely dangerous field that can lead to serious injuries — even fatalities. In fact, 15 out of every 100,000 construction workers die as a result of construction-related accidents. Though the dangers are certainly amplified in industrial settings, do-it-yourself home construction and renovation jobs can lead to life-altering injuries, as well.

According to a recent survey, about 51% of homeowners are planning on either beginning or continuing home renovation projects. Working with trusted contractors is generally recommended, especially for more advanced tasks, but plenty of homeowners still enjoy getting their hands dirty and doing the work themselves. During any kind of household renovation project, however, it's imperative that you're being as safe as possible.

Here are some dangerous things that can occur during household renovation projects:

Published in For the Home

Each day, more than 10,000 people reach the retirement age of 65 throughout the United States. And while many seniors benefit from certain financial and medical protections, that doesn't always safeguard them from harm. But one tech startup is hoping to help seniors stay safe.

One of the biggest physical risks for many seniors is the seemingly simple slip-and-fall incident. According to recent data, nearly 9,500 fatalities among older Americans are attributed to trips and falls every year, with approximately 20% to 30% of those who fall experiencing severe complications and even disabilities as a result. And because over 50% of all falls take place within the home among older adults, one company is vowing to take action to ensure the home is truly a haven for many seniors.

Cherry Labs created an in-home alarm and surveillance system, known as Cherry Home, that's powered by artificial intelligence to do just that. It can detect and track residents using microphones, compasses, vision sensors, and complex algorithms. Its creators claim that the AI system can actually distinguish different people by their faces, limb lengths, hair colors, clothing, postures, and gaits.

The idea here is to be able to prevent a fall before it actually occurs, so the information captured by the system is transmitted in real time through video footage and audio recordings (which can include instances of stumbles, cries, shouts, and other activities) over a Wi-Fi network to a separate PC equipped with a backup battery. The computer saves and analyzes that data before delivering it to caregivers and medical professionals so that they can ascertain whether the seniors in question might benefit from further treatment. If and when a more serious fall or other incident occurs, the system will send an alert to family members, nurses, and other caregivers to ensure the individual can receive help.

Although police respond to 38 million alarm activations every year, an AI system like this would probably be more precise -- or at least more helpful -- than a false alarm notification through a home security system. Backers evidently felt the same way, as Cherry Labs announced they'd received $5.2 million in funding from GSR ventures. That funding will allow for a pilot program partnership with TriCura, a mobile app platform geared towards information sharing between caregivers and agencies, and TheraCare, a service that provides caregivers for those in need.

While it isn't clear whether the average senior or familial caregiver will be able to afford the Cherry Home System (its tentative costs can range up to $2,000 for coverage of six rooms, plus a monthly subscription fee), the startup isn't the only one developing similar tools to help older populations. They are, however, providing services that other platforms currently aren't. For one thing, the video captured is processed locally (meaning it never leaves the premises) and the identity of the seniors in these videos will be protected through unique means. It's also one of the only tools that could monitor changes in behaviors, rather than just major falls, to help caregivers be more effective at their jobs and ensure seniors receive the care they need when no one else is around.

Max Goncharov, CEO and co-founder of Cherry Home, noted in a statement: "Understanding human behavior has a long list of applications, from home security to in-home senior care to the overall goal of making smart homes totally autonomous. But improving senior care is arguably one of the most important areas for technological improvement."

Published in Tech

Your home is your family's sanctuary, so you should have the tools to keep it as safe as possible. Start this year with safety at the forefront of your mind by participating in National Radon Action Month this January. The Environmental Protection Agency promotes this country-wide month of radon awareness and action to help protect against the dangerous gas.

Published in For the Home

OPEIThe official calendar start of Spring is just days away, and like many of you, I'm ready to get outside and get the winter mess cleaned-up to get a jump on making the yard nice for the year. As the lawn mowers and trimmers start to emerge from storage, it's important to make sure that those, and any power equipment, are ready to rock safely for the season. The folks over at The Outdoor Power Equipment Institute (OPEI), an international trade association representing more than 100 power equipment, engine and utility vehicle manufacturers and suppliers, has put together a list of 10 Tips for Getting Your Power Equipment Tuned-up for Spring. There's simple basic stuff here, but everyone could use a refresher once in awhile, and starting with the basics like inspecting equipment, reviewing manuals, and double-checking safety procedures is a great thing to do.

Published in Gardening

With Back-to-School Season upon us, it's time for a refresher on some helpful tips to keep kids safe throughout the school year. Miriam Sonenschein of RubberMulch checks-in with a guest post featuring 10 Tips for Back-to-School safety, covering everything from walking to school to handling strangers and safety in school and on the playground.

Published in Gardening

Seat Belt SafetyWhile our girls are still pretty young, we already face some occasional issues with getting them strapped-in and making sure that they stay buckled-up whenever we're in the car - even when parked at the bus stop. Word on the street is that tweens (ages 8-14) can be the worst when it comes to this, and the bottom line is that being buckled-up is a non-negotiable. In fact, I can tell you from experience that one of my best friends was killed five years ago when he was thrown from a vehicle after failing to wear his seat belt. I think about that every day, and as a parent, it's extremely frustrating when the little ones don't listen, and that's why the Ad Council is reminding families that parents and grownups are the #1 influence for children when it comes to seat belt safety. Regardless of how bad they may want to fight you, never give up until they buckle up.

Published in Rock Father Rides
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